Google Charts

Controls and Dashboards

Google Charts are interactive in many ways. In particular, you can combine multiple charts into dashboards and give users controls to manipulate what data they show.

Contents

Overview

Dashboards are a simple way to organize together and manage multiple charts that share the same underlying data. By using the APIs described in this page, you can free yourself from the burden of wiring together and coordinating all the charts that are part of a dashboard.

Dashboards are defined using google.visualization.Dashboard classes. Dashboard instances receive a DataTable containing the data to visualize and take care of drawing and distributing the data to all the charts that are part of the dashboard.

Controls are user interface widgets (category pickers, range sliders, autocompleters...) you interact with in order to drive the data managed by a dashboard and the charts that are part of it.

Controls are defined using google.visualization.ControlWrapper classes. You can add ControlWrapper instances to a dashboard, where they behave like pipes and valves in a plumbing system. They collect user input and use the information to decide which of the data the dashboard is managing should be made available to the charts that are part of it.

Have a look at the following example where a category picker and a range slider are used to drive the data visualized by a pie chart.

Note: The dashboard is interactive. Try operating the controls and see the chart change in real time. You can also experiment with many examples live in the Visualization Playground.

Using Controls and Dashboards

Here are the key steps for creating a dashboard and embedding it in your page. You'll find a code snippet demonstrating all these steps below, followed by detailed information about each step.

  1. Create an HTML skeleton for your dashboard. Your page must have as many HTML elements as needed to hold every member of a dashboard. This includes the dashboard itself and all the controls and charts that are part of it. Typically you'll use a <div> for each one.
  2. Load your libraries. A dashboard requires only two libraries to be included or loaded on the page: the Google AJAX API and the Google Visualization controls package.
  3. Prepare your data. You'll need to prepare the data to visualize; this means either specifying the data yourself in code, or querying a remote site for data.
  4. Create a dashboard instance. Instantiate your dashboard by calling its constructor and passing in a reference to the <div> element that will hold it.
  5. Create as many controls and charts instances as you need. Create google.visualization.ChartWrapper and google.visualization.ControlWrapper instances to describe each chart and control that the dashboard manages.
  6. Establish dependencies. Call bind() on your dashboard and pass in the control and chart instances to let the dashboard know what to manage. Once a control and chart are bound together, the dashboard updates the chart to match the constraints the control enforces over the data.
  7. Draw your dashboard. Call draw() on your dashboard and pass in your data to draw the entire dashboard on the page.
  8. Programmatic changes after draw. Optionally, after the initial draw you can programmatically drive the controls that are part of the dashboard, and have the dashboard update the charts in response to that.

Here's a simple example of a page that creates a simple dashboard with a range slider driving a pie chart. The resulting dashboard is shown below the snippet.

<html>
  <head>
    <!--Load the AJAX API-->
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://www.google.com/jsapi"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">

      // Load the Visualization API and the controls package.
      google.load('visualization', '1.0', {'packages':['controls']});

      // Set a callback to run when the Google Visualization API is loaded.
      google.setOnLoadCallback(drawDashboard);

      // Callback that creates and populates a data table,
      // instantiates a dashboard, a range slider and a pie chart,
      // passes in the data and draws it.
      function drawDashboard() {

        // Create our data table.
        var data = google.visualization.arrayToDataTable([
          ['Name', 'Donuts eaten'],
          ['Michael' , 5],
          ['Elisa', 7],
          ['Robert', 3],
          ['John', 2],
          ['Jessica', 6],
          ['Aaron', 1],
          ['Margareth', 8]
        ]);

        // Create a dashboard.
        var dashboard = new google.visualization.Dashboard(
            document.getElementById('dashboard_div'));

        // Create a range slider, passing some options
        var donutRangeSlider = new google.visualization.ControlWrapper({
          'controlType': 'NumberRangeFilter',
          'containerId': 'filter_div',
          'options': {
            'filterColumnLabel': 'Donuts eaten'
          }
        });

        // Create a pie chart, passing some options
        var pieChart = new google.visualization.ChartWrapper({
          'chartType': 'PieChart',
          'containerId': 'chart_div',
          'options': {
            'width': 300,
            'height': 300,
            'pieSliceText': 'value',
            'legend': 'right'
          }
        });

        // Establish dependencies, declaring that 'filter' drives 'pieChart',
        // so that the pie chart will only display entries that are let through
        // given the chosen slider range.
        dashboard.bind(donutRangeSlider, pieChart);

        // Draw the dashboard.
        dashboard.draw(data);
      }
    </script>
  </head>

  <body>
    <!--Div that will hold the dashboard-->
    <div id="dashboard_div">
      <!--Divs that will hold each control and chart-->
      <div id="filter_div"></div>
      <div id="chart_div"></div>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

Here's the dashboard that this code creates.

1. Create An HTML Skeleton For Your Dashboard

Your page must have as many HTML elements (typically <div>s) to hold both the dashboard itself and all the controls and charts part of it. When instantiating dashboard, control, and chart instances, you must pass a reference to their element, so assign an ID to each HTML element.

    <!--Div that will hold the dashboard-->
    <div id="dashboard_div">
      <!--Divs that will hold each control and chart-->
      <div id="filter_div"></div>
      <div id="chart_div"></div>
    </div>

You are free to position each HTML element in the way you want the dashboard to look like.

2. Load Your Libraries

A dashboard requires only two libraries to be included or loaded on the page: the Google AJAX API and the Google Visualization controls package. The API (in particular, google.visualization.ChartWrapper) automatically identifies the other packages needed (for example, gauge if you are using a Gauge chart) and loads them on the fly without further intervention from you.

You must use google.load() to fetch the control library.

<!--Load the AJAX API-->
<script type="text/javascript" src="https://www.google.com/jsapi"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">

  // Load the Visualization API and the controls package.
  // Packages for all the other charts you need will be loaded
  // automatically by the system.
  google.load('visualization', '1.0', {'packages':['controls']});

  // Set a callback to run when the Google Visualization API is loaded.
  google.setOnLoadCallback(drawDashboard);

  function drawDashboard() {
    // Everything is loaded. Assemble your dashboard...
  }
</script>

3. Prepare Your Data

When the Visualization API has been loaded, google.setOnLoadCallback() will call your handler function, so you know that all the required helper methods and classes will be ready for you to start preparing your data.

Dashboards accepts data in a DataTable, the same as charts.

4. Create A Dashboard Instance

After you have created your data, you can instantiate your dashboard object. A dashboard constructor takes one parameter: a reference to the DOM element in which to draw the dashboard.

  var dashboard = new google.visualization.Dashboard(document.getElementById('dashboard_div'));

Dashboards are exposed as a Javascript class. After instantiating your dashboard, you can perform a few optional steps such as adding event listeners (for example, to be notified once the dashboard is 'ready'). Dashboards handle events in the same way charts do, so refer to Handling Visualization Events or Displaying Errors Nicely in the chart section for more information.

5. Create Control And Chart Instances

Define as many instances you need for each control and chart that will be part of the dashboard. Use google.visualization.ChartWrapper and google.visualization.ControlWrapper to define charts and controls respectively.

  // Create a range slider, passing some options
  var donutRangeSlider = new google.visualization.ControlWrapper({
    'controlType': 'NumberRangeFilter',
    'containerId': 'filter_div',
    'options': {
      'filterColumnLabel': 'Donuts eaten'
    }
  });

  // Create a pie chart, passing some options
  var pieChart = new google.visualization.ChartWrapper({
    'chartType': 'PieChart',
    'containerId': 'chart_div',
    'options': {
      'width': 300,
      'height': 300,
      'pieSliceText': 'label'
    }
  });

When creating ChartWrapper and ControlWrapper instances, do not specify either the dataTable or the dataSourceUrl parameter. The dashboard takes care of feeding each one with the appropriate data. However, be sure to specify the required parameters: chartType and containerId for charts, controlType and containerId for controls.

A few tips about configuring controls and charts:

  • You must give all controls a filterColumnIndex (or filterColumnLabel) to specify which column of your google.visualization.DataTable the control operates on (in the example above, the control operates on the column labeled Donuts eaten),
  • Use the state configuration option on controls to initialize them with an explicit state when they are first drawn. For example, use this setting to fix the intial positions of the thumbs of a range slider control.

      var donutRangeSlider = new google.visualization.ControlWrapper({
        'controlType': 'NumberRangeFilter',
        'containerId': 'filter_div',
        'options': {
          'filterColumnLabel': 'Donuts eaten',
          'minValue': 1,
          'maxValue': 10
        },
        // Explicitly positions the thumbs at position 3 and 8,
        // out of the possible range of 1 to 10.
        'state': {'lowValue': 3, 'highValue': 8}
      });
    
        
  • All the charts that are part of a dashboard share the same underlying dataTable you prepared in the Prepare Your Data step. However, charts often require a specific arrangement of columns to display correctly: for example, a pie chart requires a string column for the label, followed by a number column for the value.

    Use the view option while configuring each ChartWrapper instance to declare which columns are relevant for the chart, as in the following example.

      var data = google.visualization.arrayToDataTable([
        ['Name', 'Gender', 'Age', 'Donuts eaten'],
        ['Michael' , 'Male', 12, 5],
        ['Elisa', 'Female', 20, 7],
        ['Robert', 'Male', 7, 3],
        ['John', 'Male', 54, 2],
        ['Jessica', 'Female', 22, 6],
        ['Aaron', 'Male', 3, 1],
        ['Margareth', 'Female', 42, 8]
      ]);
    
      var pieChart = new google.visualization.ChartWrapper({
        'chartType': 'PieChart',
        'containerId': 'chart_div',
        'options': {
          'width': 300,
          'height': 300,
          'title': 'Donuts eaten per person'
        },
        // The pie chart will use the columns 'Name' and 'Donuts eaten'
        // out of all the available ones.
        'view': {'columns': [0, 3]}
      });
    
      // The rest of dashboard configuration follows
      // ...

6. Establish Dependencies

Once you have instantiated both the dashboard and all the controls and charts that will be part it, use the bind() method to tell the dashboard about the dependencies that exist between controls and charts.

Once a control and chart are bound together, the dashboard updates the chart to match the constraints the control enforces over the data. In the example dashboard you are building, the range slider and the pie chart are bound together, so whenever you interact with the former, the latter updates to display only the data that matches the selected range.

  // 'pieChart' will update whenever you interact with 'donutRangeSlider'
  // to match the selected range.
  dashboard.bind(donutRangeSlider, pieChart);

You can bind controls and charts in many different configurations: one-to-one, one-to-many, many-to-one and many-to-many. Whenever multiple controls are bound to a chart, the dashboard updates the chart to match the combined constraints enforced by all the bound controls. At the same time, a control can drive multiple charts concurrently. To specify multiple bindings at the same time, pass in arrays to the bind() method instead of single instances. You can also chain multiple bind() calls together. Here are some examples.

  // Many-to-one binding where 'ageSelector' and 'salarySelector' concurrently
  // participate in selecting which data 'ageVsSalaryScatterPlot' visualizes.
  dashboard.bind([agePicker, salaryPicker], ageVsSalaryScatterPlot);

  // One-to-many binding where 'ageSelector' drives two charts.
  dashboard.bind(agePicker, [ageVsSalaryScatterPlot, ageBarChart]);

  // bind() chaining where each control drives its own chart.
  dashboard.bind(agePicker, ageBarChart).bind(salaryRangePicker, salaryPieChart);

For advanced usages, you can also bind controls to other controls to establish chains of dependencies, as in this playground example where country, state and city selection are linked together.

  dashboard.bind(countryPicker, regionPicker).bind(regionPicker, cityPicker);

7. Draw Your Dashboard

Call the draw() method on the dashboard instance to render the entire dashboard. The draw() method takes only one parameter: the DataTable (or DataView) that powers the dashboard.

You should call draw() every time you change the composition of the dashboard (for example by adding new controls or charts to it) or you change the overall DataTable that powers it.

The dashboard instance fires a ready event whenever draw() terminates drawing all the controls and charts that are part of it. An error event is fired if any of the managed controls or chart fails to draw. To learn more about handling events, see Handling Events.

Note: You should listen for the ready event before you try to change the dashboard composition or draw it again.

8. Programmatic Changes After Draw

Once the dashboard completes the initial draw() it will be live and respond automatically to any action you perform on it (such as changing the selected range of a control slider that is part of the dashboard).

If you need to programmatically alter the dashboard state, you can do so by operating directly on the ControlWrapper and ChartWrapper instances that are part of it. The rule of thumb is to perform any change you need directly on the specific ControlWrapper (or ChartWrapper) instance: for example, change a control options or state via setOption() and setState() respectively, and call its draw() method afterward. The dashboard will then update to match the requested changes.

The following examples shows such as case.

And here's the code for the event handlers attached to the buttons' click.

 <button onclick="changeRange();">Select range [2, 5]</button>
 <button onclick="changeOptions();">Make the pie chart 3D</button>
 <script type="text/javascript">
   function changeRange() {
     // 'slider' is the ControlWrapper instance describing the range slider.
     slider.setState({'lowValue': 2, 'highValue': 5});
     slider.draw();
   }

   function changeOptions() {
     // 'chart' is the ChartWrapper instance describing the pie chart.
     chart.setOption('is3D', true);
     chart.draw();
   }
 </script>

API Reference

This section lists the objects exposed by the Controls and Dashboards API, and the standard methods exposed by all controls.

google.visualization.Dashboard

Represents a collection of collaborating controls and charts that share the same underlying data.

Constructor

Dashboard(containerRef)
containerRef
A reference to a valid container element on the page that will hold the dashboard contents.

Methods

Dashboard exposes the following methods:

Method Return Type Description
bind(controls, charts) google.visualization.Dashboard

Binds one or more Controls to one or more other dashboard participants (either charts or other controls), so that all of the latter are redrawn whenever any of the former collects a programmatic or user interaction that affects the data managed by the dashboard. Returns the dashboard instance itself for chaining multiple bind() calls together.

  • controls - Either a single one or an array of google.visualization.ControlWrapper instances defining the controls to bind.
  • charts - Either a single one or an array of google.visualization.ChartWrapper instances defining the charts the that will be driven the by the controls.
draw(dataTable) None

Draws the dashboard.

Events

The Dashboard object throws the following events. Note that you must call Dashboard.draw() before any events will be thrown.

Name Description Properties
error Fired when an error occurs when attempting to render the dashboard. One or more of the controls and charts that are part of the dashboard may have failed rendering. id, message
ready

The dashboard has completed drawing and is ready to accept changes. All the controls and charts that are part of the dashboard are ready for external method call and user interaction. If you want to change the dashboard (or the data it displays) after you draw it, you should set up a listener for this event before you call the draw method, and then apply your changes only after the event was fired.

The ready event will also fire:

  • after the completion of a dashboard refresh triggered by a user or programmatic interaction with one of the controls,
  • after a programmatic call to the draw() method of any chart part of the dashboard.
None

google.visualization.ControlWrapper

A ControlWrapper object is a wrapper around a JSON representation of a configured control instance. The class exposes convenience methods for defining a dashboard control, drawing it and programmatically changing its state.

Constructor

ControlWrapper(opt_spec)
opt_spec
[Optional] - Either a JSON object defining the control, or a serialized string version of that object. The supported properties of the JSON object are shown in the following table. If not specified, you must set all the appropriate properties using the set... methods exposed by ControlWrapper.
Property Type Required Default Description
controlType String Required none The class name of the control. The google.visualization package name can be omitted for Google controls. Examples: CategoryFilter, NumberRangeFilter.
containerId String Required none The ID of the DOM element on your page that will host the control.
options Object Optional none An object describing the options for the control. You can use either JavaScript literal notation, or provide a handle to the object. Example: "options": {"filterColumnLabel": "Age", "minValue": 10, "maxValue": 80}
state Object Optional none An object describing the state of the control. The state collects all the variables that the user operating the control can affect. For example, a range slider state can be described in term of the positions that the low and high thumb of the slider occupy. You can use either Javascript literal notation, or provide a handle to the object. Example: "state": {"lowValue": 20, "highValue": 50}

Methods

ControlWrapper exposes the following additional methods:

Method Return Type Description
draw() None

Draws the control. Normally the dashboard holding the control takes care of drawing it. You should call draw() to force programmatic redraws of the control after you change any of its other settings, like options or state.

toJSON() String Returns a string version of the JSON representation of the control.
clone() ControlWrapper Returns a deep copy of the control wrapper.
getControlType() String The class name of the control. If this is a Google control, the name will not be qualified with google.visualization. So, for example, if this were a CategoryFilter control, it would return "CategoryFilter" rather than "google.visualization.CategoryFilter".
getControlName() String Returns the control name assigned by setControlName().
getControl() Control object reference Returns a reference to the control created by this ControlWrapper. This will return null until after you have called draw() on the ControlWrapper object (or on the dashboard holding it), and it throws a ready event. The returned object only exposes one method: resetControl(), which resets the control state to the one it was initialized with (like resetting an HTML form element).
getContainerId() String The ID of the control's DOM container element.
getOption(key, opt_default_val) Any type

Returns the specified control option value

  • key - The name of the option to retrieve. May be a qualified name, such as 'vAxis.title'.
  • opt_default_value [Optional] - If the specified value is undefined or null, this value will be returned.
getOptions() Object Returns the options object for this control.
getState() Object Returns the control state.
setControlType(type) None Sets the control type. Pass in the class name of the control to instantiate. If this is a Google control, do not qualify it with google.visualization. So, for example, for a range slider over a numeric column, pass in "NumberRangeFilter".
setControlName(name) None Sets an arbitrary name for the control. This is not shown anywhere on the control, but is for your reference only.
setContainerId(id) None Sets the ID of the containing DOM element for the control.
setOption(key, value) None Sets a single control option value, where key is the option name and value is the value. To unset an option, pass in null for the value. Note that key may be a qualified name, such as 'vAxis.title'.
setOptions(options_obj) None Sets a complete options object for a control.
setState(state_obj) None Sets the control state. The state collects all the variables that the user operating the control can affect. For example, a range slider state can be described in term of the positions that the low and high thumb of the slider occupy.

Events

The ControlWrapper object throws the following events. Note that you must call ControlWrapper.draw() (or draw the dashboard holding the control) before any events will be thrown.

Name Description Properties
error Fired when an error occurs when attempting to render the control. id, message
ready The control is ready to accept user interaction and for external method calls. If you want to interact with the control, and call methods after you draw it, you should set up a listener for this event before you call the draw method, and call them only after the event was fired. Alternatively, you can listen for a ready event on the dashboard holding the control and call control methods only after the event was fired. None
statechange Fired when the user interacts with the control, affecting its state. For example, a statechange event will fire whenever you move the thumbs of a range slider control. To retrieve an updated control state after the event fired, call ControlWrapper.getState(). None

google.visualization.ChartWrapper

Refer to google.visualization.ChartWrapper documentation in the visualizations' API reference section.

The following notes apply when using a ChartWrapper as part of a dashboard:

  • Do not set its dataTable, query, dataSourceUrl and refreshInterval attributes explicitly. The dashboard holding the chart takes care of feeding it the data it needs.
  • Do set its view attribute to declare which columns, out of all the ones present in the dataTable given to the dashboard, are relevant for the chart, as shown in Create Control and Chart Instances.

Controls Gallery

Filters are graphical elements that people can use to interactively select which data is displayed on your chart. This section describes the Google Chart filters: CategoryFilter, ChartRangeFilter, DateRangeFilter, NumberRangeFilter, and StringFilter.

You can use any of them as a parameter to ControlWrapper.setControlType().

Note: In describing options, the dot notation is used to describe nested object attributes. For example an option named 'ui.label' should be declared in an options object as var options = {"ui": {"label": "someLabelValue"} };

google.visualization.CategoryFilter

A picker to choose one or more between a set of defined values.

Code it yourself on the Visualization Playground

State

Name Type Default Description
selectedValues Array of objects or primitive types none The set of values currently selected. The selected values must be a set of the overall selectable values defined by the values option (any extraneous one will be ignored). If the CategoryFilter does not allow multiple choice, only the first value of the array is retained.

Options

Name Type Default Description
filterColumnIndex number none The column of the datatable the filter should operate upon. It is mandatory to provide either this option or filterColumnLabel. If both present, this option takes precedence.
filterColumnLabel string none The label of the column the filter should operate upon. It is mandatory to provide either this option or filterColumnIndex. If both present, filterColumnIndex takes precedence.
values Array auto List of values to choose from. If an array of Objects is used, they should have a suitable toString() representation for display to the user. If null or undefined, the list of values will be automatically computed from the values present in the DataTable column this control operates on.
useFormattedValue boolean false When populating the list of selectable values automatically from the DataTable column this filter operates on, whether to use the actual cell values or their formatted values.
ui Object null An object with members to configure various aspects of the control's UI. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:
{label: 'Metric', labelSeparator: ':'}
ui.caption string 'Choose a value...' The caption to display inside the value picker widget when no item is selected.
ui.sortValues boolean true Whether the values to choose from should be sorted.
ui.selectedValuesLayout string 'aside' How to display selected values, when multiple selection is allowed. Possible values are:
  • 'aside': selected values will display in a single text line next to the value picker widget,
  • 'below': selected values will display in a single text line below the widget,
  • 'belowWrapping': similar to below, but entries that cannot fit in the picker will wrap to a new line,
  • 'belowStacked': selected values will be displayed in a column below the widget.
ui.allowNone boolean true Whether the user is allowed not to choose any value. If false the user must choose at least one value from the available ones. During control initialization, if the option is set to false and no selectedValues state is given, the first value from the avaiable ones is automatically seleted.
ui.allowMultiple boolean true Whether multiple values can be selected, rather than just one.
ui.allowTyping boolean true Whether the user is allowed to type in a text field to narrow down the list of possible choices (via an autocompleter), or not.
ui.label string auto The label to display next to the category picker. If unspecified, the label of the column the control operates on will be used.
ui.labelSeparator string none A separator string appended to the label, to visually separate the label from the category picker.
ui.labelStacking string 'horizontal' Whether the label should display above (vertical stacking) or beside (horizontal stacking) the category picker. Use either 'vertical' or 'horizontal'.
ui.cssClass string 'google-visualization-controls-categoryfilter' The CSS class to assign to the control, for custom styling.

google.visualization.ChartRangeFilter

A slider with two thumbs superimposed onto a chart, to select a range of values from the continuous axis of the chart.

Code it yourself on the Visualization Playground

State

Name Type Default Description
range.start number, date, datetime or timeofday Range start value The start of the selected range, inclusive.
range.end number, date, datetime or timeofday Range end value The end of the selected range, inclusive.

Options

Name Type Default Description
filterColumnIndex number none The index of the column in the data table the filter operates on. It is mandatory to provide either this option or filterColumnLabel. If both are present, this option takes precedence.

Note that it only makes sense to specify an index of a domain column that is embodied in the continuous axis of the chart drawn inside the control.

filterColumnLabel string none The label of the column of the data table the filter operates on. It is mandatory to provide either this option or filterColumnIndex. If both are present, filterColumnIndex takes precedence.

Note that it only makes sense to specify an label of a domain column that is embodied in the continuous axis of the chart drawn inside the control.

ui Object null An object with members to configure various aspects of the control's UI. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:
{chartType: 'ScatterChart', chartOptions: {pointSize: 10}}
ui.chartType string 'ComboChart' The type of the chart drawn inside the control.
Can be one of: 'AreaChart', 'LineChart', 'ComboChart' or 'ScatterChart'.
ui.chartOptions Object
{
 'enableInteractivity': false,
 'chartArea': {'height': '100%'},
 'legend': {'position': 'none'},
 'hAxis': {'textPosition': 'in'},
 'vAxis': {
  'textPosition': 'none',
  'gridlines': {'color': 'none'}
 }
}
      
The configuration options of the chart drawn inside the control. Allows the same level of configuration as any chart in the dashboard, and complies with the same format as accepted by ChartWrapper.setOptions().

You can specify additional options or override the default ones (note that the defaults have been carefully chosen for optimal appearance, though).

ui.chartView Object or string (serialized Object) null Specification of the view to apply to the data table used to draw the chart inside the control. Allows the same level of configuration as any chart in the dashboard, and complies with the same format as accepted by ChartWrapper.setView(). If not specified, the data table itself is used to draw the chart.

Please note that the horizontal axis of the drawn chart must be continuous, so be careful to specify ui.chartView accordingly.

ui.minRangeSize number Data value difference interpreted as 1 pixel The minimum selectable range size (range.end - range.start), specified in data value units. For a numeric axis, it is a number (not necessarily an integer). For a date, datetime or timeofday axis, it is an integer that specifies the difference in milliseconds.
ui.snapToData boolean false If true, range thumbs are snapped to the nearest data points. In this case, the end points of the range returned by getState() are necessarily values in the data table.

Events

Additions to ControlWrapper events:

Name Description Properties
statechange Same as documented for every ControlWrapper, only has an extra boolean property, inProgress, that specifies whether the state is currently being changed (either one of the thumbs or the range itself is being dragged). inProgress

google.visualization.DateRangeFilter

A dual-valued slider for selecting ranges of dates.

Try moving the slider to change which rows are shown in the table below.

State

Name Type Default Description
lowValue number none The lower extent of the selected range, inclusive.
highValue number none The higher extent of the selected range, inclusive.
lowThumbAtMinimum boolean none Whether the lower thumb of the slider is locked at the minimum allowed range. If set, overrides lowValue.
highThumbAtMaximum boolean none Whether the higher thumb of the slider is locked at the maximum allowed range. If set, overrides highValue.

Options

Name Type Default Description
filterColumnIndex number none The column of the datatable the filter should operate upon. It is mandatory to provide either this option or filterColumnLabel. If both present, this option takes precedence. Must point to a column with type number.
filterColumnLabel string none The label of the column the filter should operate upon. It is mandatory to provide either this option or filterColumnIndex. If both present, filterColumnIndex takes precedence. Must point to a column with type number.
minValue Date auto Minimum allowed value for the range lower extent. If undefined, the value will be inferred from the contents of the DataTable managed by the control.
maxValue Date auto Maximum allowed value for the range higher extent. If undefined, the value will be inferred from the contents of the DataTable managed by the control.
ui Object null An object with members to configure various aspects of the control's UI. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:
{label: 'Age', labelSeparator: ':'}
ui.format Object none How to represent the date as a string. Accepts any valid date format.
ui.step string day The minimum possible change when dragging the slider thumbs: can be "year", "month", "hour", etc.
ui.ticks number auto The number of ticks (fixed positions in the range bar) the slider thumbs can occupy.
ui.unitIncrement number 1 The amount to increment for unit increments of the range extents. A unit increment is equivalent to using the arrow keys to move a slider thumb.
ui.blockIncrement number 10 The amount to increment for block increments of the range extents. A block increment is equivalent to using the pgUp and pgDown keys to move the slider thumbs.
ui.showRangeValues boolean true Whether to have labels next to the slider displaying extents of the selected range.
ui.orientation string 'horizontal' The slider orientation. Either 'horizontal' or 'vertical'.
ui.label string auto The label to display next to the slider. If unspecified, the label of the column the control operates on will be used.
ui.labelSeparator string none A separator string appended to the label, to visually separate the label from the slider.
ui.labelStacking string 'horizontal' Whether the label should display above (vertical stacking) or beside (horizontal stacking) the slider. Use either 'vertical' or 'horizontal'.
ui.cssClass string 'google-visualization-controls-rangefilter' The CSS class to assign to the control, for custom styling.

google.visualization.NumberRangeFilter

A dual-valued slider for selecting ranges of numeric values.

Code it yourself on the Visualization Playground

State

Name Type Default Description
lowValue number none The lower extent of the selected range, inclusive.
highValue number none The higher extent of the selected range, inclusive.
lowThumbAtMinimum boolean none Whether the lower thumb of the slider is locked at the minimum allowed range. If set, overrides lowValue.
highThumbAtMaximum boolean none Whether the higher thumb of the slider is locked at the maximum allowed range. If set, overrides highValue.

Options

Name Type Default Description
filterColumnIndex number none The column of the datatable the filter should operate upon. It is mandatory to provide either this option or filterColumnLabel. If both present, this option takes precedence. Must point to a column with type number.
filterColumnLabel string none The label of the column the filter should operate upon. It is mandatory to provide either this option or filterColumnIndex. If both present, filterColumnIndex takes precedence. Must point to a column with type number.
minValue number auto Minimum allowed value for the range lower extent. If undefined, the value will be inferred from the contents of the DataTable managed by the control.
maxValue number auto Maximum allowed value for the range higher extent. If undefined, the value will be inferred from the contents of the DataTable managed by the control.
ui Object null An object with members to configure various aspects of the control's UI. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:
{label: 'Age', labelSeparator: ':'}
ui.format Object none How to represent the number as a string. Accepts any valid number format.
ui.step number 1, or computed from ticks if defined The minimum possible change when dragging the slider thumbs.
ui.ticks number auto The number of ticks (fixed positions in the range bar) the slider thumbs can occupy.
ui.unitIncrement number 1 The amount to increment for unit increments of the range extents. A unit increment is equivalent to using the arrow keys to move a slider thumb.
ui.blockIncrement number 10 The amount to increment for block increments of the range extents. A block increment is equivalent to using the pgUp and pgDown keys to move the slider thumbs.
ui.showRangeValues boolean true Whether to have labels next to the slider displaying extents of the selected range.
ui.orientation string 'horizontal' The slider orientation. Either 'horizontal' or 'vertical'.
ui.label string auto The label to display next to the slider. If unspecified, the label of the column the control operates on will be used.
ui.labelSeparator string none A separator string appended to the label, to visually separate the label from the slider.
ui.labelStacking string 'horizontal' Whether the label should display above (vertical stacking) or beside (horizontal stacking) the slider. Use either 'vertical' or 'horizontal'.
ui.cssClass string 'google-visualization-controls-rangefilter' The CSS class to assign to the control, for custom styling.

google.visualization.StringFilter

A simple text input field that lets you filter data via string matching. It updates after every keypress: try typing j to narrow the table below to John and Jessica.

Code it yourself on the Visualization Playground

State

Name Type Default Description
value string or object none The text currently entered in the control input field.

Options

Name Type Default Description
filterColumnIndex number none The column of the datatable the filter should operate upon. It is mandatory to provide either this option or filterColumnLabel. If both present, this option takes precedence.
filterColumnLabel string none The label of the column the filter should operate upon. It is mandatory to provide either this option or filterColumnIndex. If both present, filterColumnIndex takes precedence.
matchType string 'prefix' Whether the control should match exact values only ('exact'), prefixes starting from the beginning of the value ('prefix') or any substring ('any').
caseSensitive boolean false Whether matching should be case sensitive or not.
useFormattedValue boolean false Whether the control should match against cell formatted values or againt actual values.
ui Object null An object with members to configure various aspects of the control's UI. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:
{label: 'Name', labelSeparator: ':'}
ui.realtimeTrigger boolean true Whether the control should match any time a key is pressed or only when the input field 'changes' (loss of focus or pressing the Enter key).
ui.label string auto The label to display next to the input field. If unspecified, the label of the column the control operates on will be used.
ui.labelSeparator string none A separator string appended to the label, to visually separate the label from the input field.
ui.labelStacking string 'horizontal' Whether the label should display above (vertical stacking) or beside (horizontal stacking) the input field. Use either 'vertical' or 'horizontal'.
ui.cssClass string 'google-visualization-controls-stringfilter' The CSS class to assign to the control, for custom styling.

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